Category: Fukagawa Area

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Fukagawa Rivers Haiku path and Matsuo Basho

Matsuo Basho (1644-1694) is a legendary poet in Japan, who is famous for the scene in which the poet was inspired to pen one of his masterpieces. In 1660, Basho moved to Fukagawa on the east bank of the Sumida River. Because he wanted to concentrate on his artworks. He had live there for nine...

15th May 202015th May 2020by
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Rivers in Fukagawa

Although a river named 深川 (Fukagawa) does not exist within the Fukagawa region, the existence of rivers within this area was essential for the geisha community. A kimono industry can thrive with a river nearby, and rivers can provide extra customers; they are a transportation and trade route in which boat travelers and merchants can...

15th May 202015th May 2020by
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Fukagawa Area

Fukagawa is named after its founder, Fukagawa Hachirozaemon. Originally, parts of Fukagawa below the Eitai river (excluding Etchujima) was sea; Hachirozaemon developed these areas with landfills. After losing about 60 percent of the city in the Great Fire of Meireki of 1657, the shogunate ordered for Buddhist temples on the east bank of the Sumida...

4th May 20204th May 2020by
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Rice and Grains

by ainaoyama Before Fukagawa became an official solid prefecture of Japan, there were several events occurred in the past. One of the most significant ones was the Great Fire of Meireki. The Great Fire of Meireki was believed to be fired accidentally by a priest who was cremating a cursed kimono which murdered three teenage girls.When the...

22nd February 201922nd February 2019by
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Fukagawa Geisha

by xitan Fukagawa is a neighborhood of Tokyo, which was home to a prominent unlicensed prostitution district during the Edo period. In addition to prostitution, the area was known particularly for its haori geisha, also known as tatsumi geisha, geisha who dressed in a masculine mode,[1] and may have been the site of the emergence...

22nd February 201922nd February 2019by
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How Fukagawa Was Primed For Geisha

by Picabo Fukagawa may have only been a small district in the history of geisha in Tokyo, however there are several historical aspects that make the Fukagawa geisha stand out, such as how the very beginning of female geisha is said to have originated within this districts borders. This major aspect of Geisha history makes...

22nd February 201922nd February 2019by
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Fukagawa Historical Landmarks

by Picabo Fukagawa is a neighbourhood east of Nihombashi, at the other side of the Sumidagawa river. It started out as a lumber district in the 17th and 18th century and rose to prominence as a shipping centre for rice, salt and fertilizer. Fukagawa has been widely featured in many Ukiyo-e in the Edo period (1603-1868),...

22nd February 201915th May 2020by
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Changes of Fukagawa Districts

by misarai723 Fukagawa is in downtown Tokyo, or Shitamachi. The name comes from a man who was a pioneer at Fukagawa, Fukagawa Yarouuemon, or 深川八郎右衛門. The picture below is a map of Fukagawa in Edo era. Although just viewing this map might be fun, but if you know how to look at this map, it...

22nd February 201922nd February 2019by
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Fukagawa District

by Ji Myounghun (MJ) Fukagawa is located in Koto, Japan and was first known for the concentrations of the trading posts and merchants. Through the river lines along the Sumida River to the sea, many ports were seen near the woods stocks from the blooming lumber industries. Through several sea merchants flowing by Fukagawa, entertainments/habitats were...

22nd February 201922nd February 2019by
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Lumber Industry in Fukagawa – Koto City

Currently, Koto City where Fukagawa is located is famous for its significant aspects of location with a rich waterfront and lush greenery. Pursuing the ideology of “omotenashi” and promoting preservation of environments, Koto city once was a prospered lumber industry centered location during Edo era. Facing Tokyo Bay with Sumida and Arakawa Rivers, such waterways...

10th September 201822nd February 2019by