Category: Fukagawa Geisha History

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Fukagawa Edo Shiryokan

Fukagawa Edo Museum is also known as the Edo Shiryokan. It is found in 1986 in Koto, Japan. It is located near the Kiyosumi Gardens and Fukagawa Fudoson Temple. The museum is reconstruction of a small portion of the Fukagawa District, and the museum shows the area where mainly commoners lived in the early 19th...

8th May 20208th May 2020by
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Fukagawa Edo Museum: Kiyosumi-Shirakawa

Looking almost like a film set for a historical drama, the main exhibit here is a life-size reconstruction of an early nineteenth-century neighorhood on the banks of the Sumida River, filled with shops, warehouses, private houses, and even a canal with a traditionally built boat. There are eleven buildings in all, and you can take...

8th May 20208th May 2020by
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Basho Museum

The Basho Museum, which opened in 1981, exhibits material related to haiku, especially to the haiku poet, Matsuo Basho, contributed by Manabe Giju and others. The museum is at the area where Basho produced many famous haiku and travel writings such as the Narrow Road to the Deep North. After the great tidal wave that...

8th May 20208th May 2020by
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Fukgawa Edo Museum: A Unique Way to Learn About Historical Fukagawa

The Fukagawa Edo Museum, located a short walk away from Kiyosumi Shirakawa Station, is an interesting and pleasant destination for anyone curious about Fukagawa in the Edo period, however the information about geisha specifically is limited. In preparation for our presentation, my group went to find out as much about the history of geisha in...

8th May 20208th May 2020by
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Fukagawa Edo Shiryokan

Fukagawa Edo Shiryokan (深川江戸資料館) is an replicated indoor installment of 19th century Edo Shitamachi neighborhoods during late Tokugawa period. This historical replica exhibition depicts the nature of trade centered scene in Fukagawa district through fully-scaled old settlements, merchant stores, and fire watchtowers. The varieties of arrangements installed within the recreation of Edo help visitors guide through the...

6th May 20206th May 2020by
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The history of Geisha after WW2

Hanamachi, where geisha live, had a large damage by the aerial attacks by the U.S. However, even from the ruins, the industry of geisha blooms. The Occupation army became the new customers for geisha. As the Japanese market started to bloom with high economic growth period, the world of geisha prospered again. However, as Japanese...

6th May 20206th May 2020by
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Geisha tradition after WW2

During the World War 2 in the 1950s, Geisha in Japan had to help the nation. Many of them were forced to work in factories to make munitions, vehicles, pharmaceuticals and electrical goods for the army. These women were called the “Comfort Women”. Moreover, they were treated as sexual slaves to the American military. The Comfort Women...

6th May 20206th May 2020by
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Fukagawa Geisha

Fukagawa is a neighborhood of Tokyo, which was home to a prominent unlicensed prostitution district during the Edo period. In addition to prostitution, the area was known particularly for its haori geisha, also known as tatsumi geisha, geisha who dressed in a masculine mode,[1] and may have been the site of the emergence of the...

6th May 20206th May 2020by
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Rice and Grains

The origin of Fukagawa Before Fukagawa became an official solid prefecture of Japan, there were several events occurred in the past. One of the most significant ones was the Great Fire of Meireki. The Great Fire of Meireki was believed to be fired accidentally by a priest who was cremating a cursed kimono which murdered three teenage...

6th May 20206th May 2020by
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Fukagawa Geisha in the Edo Period

Fukagawa geisha is said to have originated from dancers in Edo. They moved to Fukagawa fearing fire, from the Great Fire of Akechi in 1657. Many samurai families, temples and merchants moved to Fukagawa as well, establishing a thriving area for the geisha to work in despite not receiving recognition from the shogunate like the...

6th May 20206th May 2020by
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