Category: Fukagawa Geisha History

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Fukagawa Geisha History – pre Meiji

From the Edo period, at first, geisha were all men but not women. During the mid-1700s, male geisha were hired to be entertainers for the parties in the Yoshiwara and somewhere else. However, later female entertainers started feeling they should be geisha too when they realized how popular male geisha was. So in 1751, the...

4th May 20204th May 2020by
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The Origin of “Tatsumi”

As anyone looking into Fukagawa geisha will quickly find out, the geisha of Fukagawa were known by two names; one being the obvious title of “Fukagawa Geisha” and the other being the less straightforward misnomer, “Tatsumi Geisha”. Naturally, there’s not much of a story behind their first name, however the term “Tatsumi” has quite an...

4th May 20204th May 2020by
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How Fukagawa Was Primed For Geisha

Fukagawa may have only been a small district in the history of geisha in Tokyo, however there are several historical aspects that make the Fukagawa geisha stand out, such as how the very beginning of female geisha is said to have originated within this districts borders. This major aspect of Geisha history makes it important...

15th December 201715th December 2017by
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The Legendary Kikuya

  Throughout all of geisha history there are a few names that withstand the tests of time and are passed down through the years as records of talented women who bore them. One of these names belongs to a young girl from edo-era Fukagawa whose renown and actions changed Japanese culture forever: Kikuya. To understand...

15th December 201715th December 2017by
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Fukagawa Geisha History – WW2 to losing the geisha office

In 1868, Meiji Emperor ascended the throne and the shogunate era went to its end. Geisha in Japan entered their Golden Age. In the 1930s, before WW2, is the heyday of the Japan geisha. The number of the geisha arrived around 2 million 5 thousand. However, by this time, Fukagawa had already nearly disappeared as...

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Fukagawa Edo Museum

Fukagawa Edo Museum is a small museum which is full recreation of a 17th-18th century neighborhood with alleys, open houses, workshops and stores, where visitors can really get a feel for what life was like in Edo. Walking around the reconstruction of the Sagacho area of Fukagawa teaches visitors about the importance of stowing away futons, lets visitors in...

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