Category: Fukagawa and Geisha

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Fukagawa Geisha and Fukagawa Festival

The Fukagawa Hachiman Matsuri is considered top three summer festival in Tokyo. The festival is held on August 15th and thirty thousand people participate and half a million people are watching. Every year, more than 50 teams walk the roads of Fukagawa while carrying 2,000-kilogram-mikoshi, or portable shrines. The bystanders throw water to the participants...

16th May 202016th May 2020by
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Tomioka Hachimangu and How it shaped Fukagawa’s Geisha Industry

The Tomioka Hachimangu shrine, originally built in 1627, was one of Fukagawa largest attractions in the edo era and possibly part of why Fukagawa was able to house such a popular geisha district, despite being unlicensed under the tokugawa shogunate. The Tomioka shrine is actually one of many shrines dedicated to the Shinto god Hachiman....

16th May 202016th May 2020by
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Fukagawa Hachiman Festival

The Fukagawa Hachiman Festival started 400 years ago, in 1641, during the Edo period. It first started to honor the god Hachiman and also to celebrate the birth of Tokugawa letsuna, who later became the fourth shogun of Tokugawa shonugate. Although the first Hachiman Festival happened on March 2nd, it happens annually around mid-August, on...

16th May 202016th May 2020by
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The Annual Tomioka Hachiman Grand Festival (Main Festival)

This traditional festival (matsuri), held every year on August 15th at Tomioka Hachiman Shrine, is also known as Fukagawa Hachiman Matsuri. Alongside the Sanno Matsuri of Hie Shrine, Akasaka, and the Kanda Matsuri of Kanda Myojin, it is considered one of the Three Great Festivals of Edo. This year marks the long-awaited “Hon-Matsuri” or “Main...

16th May 202016th May 2020by
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Fukagawa Hachiman Festival

One of the Three Great Festivals of Edo (Tokyo), Fukagawa Hachiman Festival takes place at Tomioka Hachiman Shrine. This is the largest shrine dedicated to the God, Hachiman in Tokyo. Fukagawa Hachiman Festival dates back to the order of the Tokugawa shogunate. It was first held to celebrate the birth of Ietsuna Tokugawa, the 4th...

16th May 202016th May 2020by
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Fukagawa Festival – Tomioka Hachimangu and geisha

During the Edo era, there were there large Shinto festivals. One of the very distinctive and well-known festivals is Fukagawa Hachiman Matsuri (深川八幡祭 ), as known as Fukagawa Festival. Fukagawa Matsuri is held annually in mid-August by the Tomioka Hachiman Shrine in Koto, Tokyo. Tomioka Hachimangu, as known as Tomioka Yawata shrine, is Fukagawa’s greatest...

16th May 202016th May 2020by
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Hangyoku Henshin Diary

10th of December 2017 An once in a lifetime experience 7:30 Me and my friends met up at our dorm and started traveling to Asakusa station. It was still a bit dark outside and the degree was only around 5-7 Celcius. However, our group had managed to wake up on time for the trip and...

16th May 202016th May 2020by
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What is “Hangyoku” ?

The full-fledged geisha is called “ippon” and the fledgling geisha is called “hangyoku” (半玉). The word Hangyoku translates to ‘half jewel’ as they were paid half as much as their fully-fledged Geisha colleagues. This is also another label for those who are still in training to be a professional entertainer. However, nowadays, the charge for “hangyoku”(the regular name...

16th May 202016th May 2020by
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Importance of Kimono

Being the sign of official Geisha, Kimono is very crucial to them. They finally get to wear Kimono after hard, long training to be Geisha. It proves the improvement as a trainee to an official Geisha. Also, kimono is a symbol for Geisha’s professionalism. Geisha do not wear underwear under Kimono because it disrupts the...

16th May 202016th May 2020by
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Seasonal Kanzashi – Maiko Hair Ornaments by Month

Kanzashi (簪) are hair ornaments used in traditional Japanese hairstyles. Kanzashi were first used in Japan during the Jōmon period. During that time, a single thin rod or stick was considered to have mystical powers which could ward off evil spirits, so people would wear them in their hair. This is also when some of the first predecessors of the modern Japanese hair...

16th May 202016th May 2020by